Instagram #Frame

Whilst awaiting to embark on my Final Major Project which begins next month, I have still been posting images onto my Instagram page with the Hashtag #Frame.

Soon we will will be given another keyword (hashtag) and uploading new images. Here is a selection of the images that I have uploaded:

All images © Richard Brochu-Williams

All Rights reserved

Images can be viewed at brochuwilliamsphotography on Instagram

Landscape Inspiration

I am constantly looking to other photographers work to help inspire me in my own practice. I found an artist/photographer by the name of Dariusz Klimczak (1967), who was born in Sieradz, Poland. Since 2006 he has been living with his family in the countryside, near Leba. Klimczak is a graduate of the art school in Zduńska-Wola.

Like myself he has a real passion for photography and likes to produce black and white images in a square format. The four images that I have chosen are not in black and white but I chose these particular images as my inspiration, as they have a real beauty and quality about them. The saturation of colour within the images really draws you in for a closer look.

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© Dariusz Klimczak

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© Dariusz Klimczak

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© Dariusz Klimczak

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© Dariusz Klimczak

The thing that drew my attention to these images was that they were capturing interesting and sometimes out of place objects within the scene. I especially love the second image with the reflection of the trees and leaves in the water. It is simple in its design but it goes to show that with a bit of imagination that you can acquire a really effective and eye-catching image from what could otherwise be a very ordinary photograph. I must try and be more creative myself when I am taking my pictures.

Here are some more examples of Klimczak’s work. These are examples of the black and white, square formats and they are more surrealistic in their nature. They very much remind me of the artwork created by Salvador Dalí.

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© Dariusz Klimczak

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© Dariusz Klimczak

Dariusz Klimczak’s work can be viewed on his website on the link which can be found below.

References

Kwadrart.com. 2014. KWADRART – Dariusz Klimczak – fotografia kreatywna, fotografia artystyczna, fotomontaże | Gdańsk | Warszawa | Łódź | Poznań | Kraków. [online] Available at: http://www.kwadrart.com [Accessed: 28 Mar 2014].

Experimentation

Today I decided to experiment with more abstract landscape images, as this is something that I would like to take through into my final project towards the end of the year. I will also be looking at other abstract images that are not necessarily related to landscape.

Here are some images that I have been working on today.

 

Lackford Lakes

Lackford Lakes

Lackford Lakes

Lackford Lakes

Monaco

Monaco

I’m really happy with the results and look forward to more experimentation.

Here is another image that is completely unrelated to landscape photography, but another area of photography that I am interested in…Animals.

Brian

Brian

Abstract Portraiture

Whilst browsing on a well known social media site, I came across a picture that a friend had shared and I found the image fascinating. I had come across images such as this before but this time I felt inspired to try and create my own. My attempt is feeble but this has inspired me to experiment more and create a better image in the future. My image looks a little more abstract and instead of using two images to create the final, I only worked with one. The images are supposed to show a side portrait and a face on portrait within the same image, some work better than others.

I look forward to experimenting with this type of imagery further sometime in the near future.

My Image (& First Attempt)

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Fréd – Front & Side
© Richard Brochu-Williams

Image I Was Inspired By.

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© Baíki Bk

“Respeite o ponto de vista das pessoas, as vezes estamos vendo a mesma coisa porém de forma diferente…”

“Please respect other people’s point of view, sometimes we see the same thing but differently …”

Bk, B. 2013. Respect Other People’s Point of View. [image online] Available at: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=492152107560114&set=pb.100002959864531.-2207520000.1388501166.&type=3&theater [Accessed: 31 Dec 2013].

Other Examples:

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Source: Unknown Artist

Unknown. 2012. Front or Side Face?. [image online] Available at: http://9bytz.com/front-or-side-face/ [Accessed: 31 Dec 2013].

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A Portrait of a Profile
© Mick Nasty

Nasty, M. 2011. A Portrait of a Profile. [image online] Available at: http://twistedsifter.com/2011/05/picture-of-the-day-a-portrait-of-a-profile/ [Accessed: 31 Dec 2013].

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Creepy Double Face Illusion
© Coaleu

Coaleau. 2011. Creepy Double Face Illusion. [image online] Available at: http://www.instructables.com/id/Creepy-Double-Face-Illusion/ [Accessed: 31 Dec 2013].

The one thing that put me off of the above image is; that because it is made from a composite of two images, the eye does not look right for a face on (looking straight on) portrait and the side profile has two nostrils. My favourite out of all the images is the black and white image by Baíki Bk, it is well thought out and works spectacularly, I found it quite a challenge trying to create such an image. More practice is required.

Portraiture (Pet)

Whilst looking at the theme of portraiture I decided to attempt some pet portraiture images. The images have not been taken in a studio setting, as this is something I am not too keen on. I like to capture the subject in its own surroundings where it feels more comfortable and at ease. I did not have a great deal of time taking these pictures as they were taken on Boxing Day and the dogs that I photographed were very excitable and very hard to capture but nevertheless I managed to capture a few images. 🙂

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Mia
© Richard Brochu-Williams

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Tigger
© Richard Brochu-Williams

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Mia
© Richard Brochu-Williams

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Tigger “Too Much Mulled Wine!”
© Richard Brochu-Williams

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Dexter
© Richard Brochu-Williams

All Images © Richard Brochu-Williams, 2013

Portraiture

I chose to look at portraiture again today and to see what I could do with an image to make it a little different from a straightforward portraiture picture. I played around with a couple of techniques to see what I could achieve.

My Images

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Fréd
© Richard Brochu-Williams

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Fréd 2
© Richard Brochu-Williams

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Fréd “Pop”
© Richard Brochu-Williams

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Fréd “Pop” Collage
© Richard Brochu-Williams

The “Pop” images are of course inspired by Andy Warhol’s work and relate back to my blog about “intertextuality” within art. The link to this can be found below.

https://brochuwilliams.wordpress.com/2013/11/27/intertextuality-2/

I found a guide to achieving the effect in Digital Photo Magazine.

Adams, J. 2011. Creative Portrait Effects. Digital Photo, Iss. 141 pp. 42-47.

Potraiture (Holga Effect)

Yesterday, whilst on my travels to Lowestoft, Suffolk, I decided that I would look at portraiture photography as I had not done this in a while. I’m not one for creating portraiture images within the confines of a studio space, rather I prefer to capture my subject in natural surroundings where they feel most comfortable. I like portraiture in the style of reportage, as the subjects feel more at ease and therefore creating an image that looks more “real” than forced.

I decided to create the portraiture images with a “Holga” effect. This kind of effect is currently en vogue and is popular alongside with lomography and the effects that you can achieve with Instagram.

Holga

The Holga camera was designed by T. M. Lee in 1981 and it first appeared outside China in 1982 in Hong Kong. The Holga is a medium format 120 film camera, made in Hong Kong, known for its low-fidelity aesthetic.

The Holga’s low-cost construction and simple meniscus lens often yields pictures that display vignetting, blur, light leaks, and other distortions. The camera’s limitations have brought it a cult following among some photographers, and Holga photos have won awards and competitions in art and news photography.

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Holga Camera
Image: Mark Wheeler

Wikipedia. 2013. Holga. [online] Available at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holga [Accessed: 21 Dec 2013].

Wheeler, M. 2013. Holga 120. [image online] Available at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Holga_120_GCFN.jpg [Accessed: 21 Dec 2013].

Creating My Images

To achieve the Holga effect I used Photoshop CS5 and a plug-in from OnOne called PhotoTools 2.6 that contained the Holga Black & White filter.

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Step 1
© Richard Brochu-Williams

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Step 2
© Richard Brochu-Williams

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Step 3
© Richard Brochu-Williams

As well as applying the filter, I also made adjustments to it, so that the effect would compliment the images. I have noticed that some of my highlights are blown out, this is due to the filter that has been applied and not the images that I captured at the time. I know this, because when I shoot I use the “Highlights” display on my  Nikon D90 to make sure that my highlights are not blown out. At this stage I am not too concerned as these images are just in the experimental stage.

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Highlights Display Mode – Nikon

Imaging Resource. 2013. Nikon: Playback Mode. [image online] Available at: http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/D300S/D300SA3.HTM [Accessed: 21 Dec 2013].

My Images

All images © Richard Brochu-Williams, 2013. All rights reserved.

Anyone with a keen interest in photography (especially analogue) and the Holga effect can find information on the following link.

Holga Inspire. 2013. HOLGA. [online] Available at: http://holgainspire.com/ [Accessed: 21 Dec 2013].

Abstract (Droste)

I have decided to keep on the theme of abstract imagery and today I have been looking at “The Droste Effect”

What is The Droste Effect ?

The Droste effect — known as mise en abyme in art — is the effect of a picture appearing within itself, in a place where a similar picture would realistically be expected to appear. The appearance is recursive: the smaller version contains an even smaller version of the picture, and so on. Only in theory could this go on forever; practically, it continues only as long as the resolution of the picture allows, which is relatively short, since each iteration geometrically reduces the picture’s size. It is a visual example of a strange loop, a self-referential system of instancing which is the cornerstone of fractal geometry.

Origin

The effect is named after the image on the tins and boxes of Droste cocoa powder, one of the main Dutch brands, which displayed a nurse carrying a serving tray with a cup of hot chocolate and a box with the same image. This image, introduced in 1904 and maintained for decades with slight variations, became a household notion. Reportedly, poet and columnist Nico Scheepmaker introduced wider usage of the term in the late 1970s.

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Droste Nurse Image.
The woman holds an object bearing a smaller image of her holding the same object, which in turn bears a smaller image of her holding the same object, and so on. Image believed to have been created by Jan (Johannes) Musset, being inspired by a pastel known as La Belle Chocolatière (“The Pretty Chocolate Girl”).

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The Chocolate Girl (French: La Belle Chocolatière, German: Das Schokoladenmädchen) is one of the most prominent pastels of Swiss artist Jean-Étienne Liotard, showing a chocolate-serving maid. The girl carries a tray with a porcelain chocolate mug and a glass of water. Liotard’s contemporaries classed The Chocolate Girl as his masterpiece.

Wikipedia. 2013. Droste Effect. [online] Available at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Droste_effect [Accessed: 17 Dec 2013].

Wikipedia. 2013. The Chocolate Girl. [online] Available at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chocolate_Girl [Accessed: 17 Dec 2013].

Example of an image with The Droste Effect

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Droste Image
Image Credit: Mayone1
Original: Stephanie Vacher

Flickr. 2013. trufflepig droste copy. [online] Available at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/manyone/804054500/in/pool-escherdroste/ [Accessed: 17 Dec 2013].

Flickr. 2013. hehe. [online] Available at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/trufflepig/384422727 [Accessed: 17 Dec 2013].

My Images

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“Time at a Snails Pace”, 2013
© Richard Brochu-Williams

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“Ben”, 2013
© Richard Brochu-Williams

Therfield Heath

Today I travelled to Therfield Heath with the intention of taking some landscape photographs, but what I came back with was a lot different from what I had envisaged. This seems to be a common theme with me, not that I am complaining…at least I got a couple of images that I was happy with and had a nice walk on the heath along the way.

Therfield Heath is a biological Site of Special Scientific Interest and Local Nature Reserve on the chalk escarpment just north of Therfield, Hertfordshire; since it lies south-west of the town of Royston it is also known locally as Royston Heath. It has a testing racetrack for horses on its slopes and is a popular spot with dog walkers and birdwatchers. The Heath has a common on which sheep are still regularly grazed.

The site offers very good views towards the north, over the valley of the Cam as far as Cambridge. The Heath is a golf course but nevertheless provides some fine walking. At the foot of the heath sits the thriving Heath Sports Club (HSC), with facilities including a gym, squash courts, bar and bistro. The HSC is home also home to Royston Hockey Club, Royston Rugby Club & Royston Runners amongst others.

 

Wikipedia. 2013. Therfield Heath. [online] Available at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Therfield_Heath [Accessed: 14 Dec 2013].

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Therfield Heath
© Richard Brochu-Williams

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Therfield Heath
© Richard Brochu-Williams

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Therfield Heath
© Richard Brochu-Williams

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Therfield Heath
© Richard Brochu-Williams

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Therfield Heath
© Richard Brochu-Williams

Stereographic Projection

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Therfield Heath | Golf Course
© Richard Brochu-Williams

Cambridge American Cemetery (Madingley)

Landscape / Architectural Photography

All images © Richard Brochu-Williams, 2013. All rights reserved.

Yesterday I decided to go on a walk with my camera and capture some more landscape images. I chose to go to the American Cemetery, Madingley, Cambridge, as it is a beautiful place that is surrounded by lovely countryside. Once inside the cemetery I found myself being drawn not to the countryside but to the wonderful architecture within the cemetery grounds. So I started out with landscape images in mind but decided to photograph the buildings and other objects that surrounded me.

All images © Richard Brochu-Williams, 2013. All rights reserved.

Inside the Memorial War Building there were stained glass replicas of the Seals of the States of the Union arranged from left to right in the order that they entered the union.

Image Image Image Image

All images © Richard Brochu-Williams, 2013. All rights reserved.

I must have spent over an hour at the cemetery, it was peaceful and nobody else was around, except a grounds maintenance guy. This gave me the opportunity to reflect and think about my surroundings and be able to work uninterrupted. The temperature must have been close to 1°C, it was cold and I could see my breath, but I was amazed to see that there were a number of red roses that were still in bloom.

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Polyantha Rose
© Richard Brochu-Williams, 2013

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Polyantha Rose
© Richard Brochu-Williams, 2013

I also took a picture of the exterior of the Memorial Building. The building itself is beautiful and what really sets it off when viewing it from afar are the 2 giant reflecting pools, one leading up to the Memorial Building and the other to the 72ft flagpole. I produced a stereographic image.

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Stereographic Projection of Memorial Building
© Richard Brochu-Williams

These were the kinds of images that I set out to produce and along the way I realised that I was able to combine landscape and architecture within my images, as architecture is part of the landscape.

All images © Richard Brochu-Williams, 2013. All rights reserved.