Devon & Cornwall

What better to do whilst the sun is shining, than visit Devon & Cornwall. I visited the Eden Project and some National Trust sites during my stay and took plenty of photographs. Please enjoy!

 

The Eden Project

 

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© Google Maps 2016

 

 

Lanhydrock

 

 

Lydford Gorge

 

 

Buckland Abbey

 

 

Cotehele

 

 

References

Eden Project Cornwall UK. (2016). Eden Project – Home. [online] Available at: http://www.edenproject.com [Accessed 14 Sep. 2016].

National Trust. (2016). Buckland Abbey. [online] Available at: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/buckland-abbey [Accessed 14 Sep. 2016].

National Trust. (2016). Cotehele. [online] Available at: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/cotehele [Accessed 14 Sep. 2016].

National Trust. (2016). Lanhydrock. [online] Available at: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/lanhydrock [Accessed 14 Sep. 2016].

National Trust. (2016). Lydford Gorge. [online] Available at: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/lydford-gorge [Accessed 14 Sep. 2016].

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Moseley Old Hall

Moseley Old Hall is a National Trust property which is located in Fordhouses, north of Wolverhampton. It is famous as one of the resting places of Charles II of England during his escape to France following defeat at the Battle of Worcester in 1651.

A variety of 17th-century plants, a fruit orchard and a striking ‘knot’ garden adorn the graceful gardens.

 

Location of Moseley Old Hall

 

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© Google Maps 2016

 

The inspiration for knot gardens

 

“Knot gardens are based on Renaissance designs used in many forms of indoor decoration such as fabrics, carpets, cushions and wall coverings.

Some gardens were intricate patterns involving low hedges intricately knotted together on a gravel base. These were small in scale and complete in themselves and were known as ‘closed knots’.

Others were simpler but more extensive and always enclosed and inward looking. These ‘open’ knots, like the one here at Moseley, were usually intended as a place to grow plants as well as an exercise in geometry.”

(National Trust, 2016)

As usual, during my visits to the National Trust properties, I took along my camera and captured some images.

 

 

 

 

References

National Trust. (2016). Moseley Old Hall. [online] Available at: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/moseley-old-hall [Accessed 9 Sep. 2016].

Clumber Park

For those who like walking and the great outdoors, Clumber Park is a great place to visit. Consisting of a beautiful expanse of parkland, heath and woods that cover more than 3,800 acres, it is easy to loose yourself here whilst exploring. In addition there is also an impressive lake. Clumber Park is host to a variegation of habitats which are home to an amazing array of wildlife and it is also a great place to admire it.

 

Location

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© Google Maps 2016

 

On and around the lake

 

 

Squirrel 

 

 

References

National Trust. (2016). Clumber Park. [online] Available at: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/clumber-park [Accessed 8 Sep. 2016].

Waddesdon Manor

A great place to visit which is surrounded by views of Oxfordshire, the Chilterns Hills & the Vale of Aylesbury. An ideal place for relaxing with family and friends.

Waddesdon Manor is a French Renaissance-style château built 1874, which is host to Victorian style gardens, a parterre, ornate fountains and statuary. There is also an Aviary with rare and exotic birds which can be found in the heart of the gardens.There are also plenty of woodland walks for guests to enjoy.

Here I spent a whole day and enjoyed the sunshine and taking photos. Enjoy!

 

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Aviary

 

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References

National Trust. (2016). Waddesdon Manor. [online] Available at: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/waddesdon-manor [Accessed 15 Aug. 2016].

Bourne Mill, Essex

Not wanting to waste an opportunity of soaking up the sunshine and enjoying the great outdoors during this glorious spell of weather that we have at present, I decided to visit Bourne Mill in Colchester. A quaint water mill with a history dating back over 1000 years. A great retreat away from the hustle and bustle of the historic town of Colchester.

 

Bourne Mill

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Inside the Mill

 

Outside

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Then a quick drive to Copt Hall Marshes…

 

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References

National Trust. (2016). Bourne Mill. [online] Available at: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/bourne-mill [Accessed 20 Jul. 2016].

National Trust. (2016). Copt Hall Marshes. [online] Available at: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/copt-hall-marshes [Accessed 20 Jul. 2016].

Nymans

Last weekend we had such beautiful weather that it would have been a shame not to make the most of it, so I headed down south and visited the wonderful and peaceful gardens at Nymans, Handcross, nr Haywards Heath in West Sussex.

 

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Imagery © 2016 Bluesky, DigitalGlobe, Getmapping plc, Infoterra Ltd & Bluesky, Landsat, Map Data © 2016 Google

 

The gardens are a treat for the eye and contain mixed borders of perennials and annuals. The garden is also house to romantic ruins, intimate gardens, and internationally recognised plant collections against a backdrop of Wealden woodland. Great for those who like to escape the hustle and bustle of city life and recharge the batteries.

If you’re feeling a little more adventurous or energetic, your visit can be complemented by a walk around the surrounding estate, an area of the High Weald, designated an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty in 1983.

 

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© Crown copyright and database rights 2013 Ordnance Survey

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Entrance to Nymans

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Entrance to Nymans

 

The Gardens

 

 

The Woods

 

 

 

References

National Trust. (2016). Nymans. [online] Available at: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/nymans [Accessed 11 May 2016].

Dunham Massey

At this time of year it is rare that I have a full weekend off from work, so when I finally found myself with both Saturday & Sunday off I decided to seize the opportunity and travel up north to Cheshire and spend the weekend away. I chose to visit Dunham Massey because I had not been there before and there seemed to be a lot on offer.

There is a garden for all seasons, an ancient deer park and a house filled with treasures and stories. My main reason for visiting was to stroll in the park and take some pictures of the deer that live there.

“Dunham Massey has all the elements of a great medieval deer park. On a walk through the grounds you’ll see fine avenues, wide vistas, ancient trees, roaming deer and open grassland.”

(National Trust, 2016)

 

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The deer park at Dunham Massey is around 300 acres in size and dates back to medieval times. There is a beautiful pond with resident swans and other species of bird and it is a great experience to roam through the park and walk amongst the free roaming deer.

 

 

References

National Trust. (2016). A Perfect Parkland. [online] Available at: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/features/dunham-masseys-parkland [Accessed 20 Apr. 2016].