Capturing a Panorama

Whilst looking through my monthly subscription to Digital Photo magazine, I came across an interesting article which showcased a panoramic landscape photograph by an Australian photographer by the name of Jadon Smith. It explains how he captured the shot and the techniques that he used. His final image was made up from 5 individual images and he describes how he had to take the shots hand held, as he did not have a tripod with him at that particular time…something I can relate to earlier on in the week, when I forgot to pack my own tripod. The lens that he used was a 28-300mm, which is not ideally the best lens but he had to make do and I must say that his final image did not suffer despite this.

Smith shot in Aperture priority mode with the aperture set to f/13, to make sure that he obtained a deep zone of sharp focus. He shot in RAW and processed the images in Lightroom to get the overall exposure correct. Photoshop was used for the sticking (I prefer to use Hugin, as in my opinion it does a better job).

When shooting a multi shot panorama, there are some tips that can be very useful:

  • Although multi shot panorama can be taken hand held, it’s a good idea to use a tripod to keep your shots level.
  • Attach your camera securely to the head, then tilt it 90º so that you are shooting in portrait orientation (this means that you get more of the sky and the ground within the picture).
  • After each shot, pan across, ensuring that you incorporate a large overlap between shots (around 30% should be sufficient).

Jadon Smith’s image can be viewed by clicking on this link.

Image

Digital Photo Magazine | May 2014

References

500px.com, (2014). Yosemite HDR. [online] Available at: http://500px.com/photo/61659831/yosemite-hdr-by-jadon-smith?from=user [Accessed 26 Apr. 2014].

Capture the Full Majesty of a Scene with a Panorama. (2014). Digital Photo, (181), pp.22-23.

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